Beware of Lawyers’ Blogs 20:39, July 5, 2016

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Author: LawRoom Blog

Looking for insight into the latest news in employment law? If so, you might want to avoid reading a blog post. Many legal bloggers do an amazing job, processing cases within minutes (or days) of their release. And then they do another, and another, and another. So, they’re in a hurry. And because they’re writing […]

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Q: May employees take FMLA intermittent leave to care for a sick spouse? A: Since 2009 the regulations haven’t authorized it, but they may soon. The US Department of Labor (DOL) proposed new rules for the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) on January 30, 2012. Besides expanding family leave benefits for veterans, they also […]

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A new California law for 2012, AB 887, expands the definition of “sex” in the legal codes for various purposes, including the employment discrimination law. Previously, “sex” referred to a person’s gender, which included their “gender identity.” AB 887 amends the definition so that it now will include a person’s “gender expression.” For example, although […]

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The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) stirred up a controversy in 2011 by adopting a regulation requiring most US employers to put up a poster about employees’ federal labor rights under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). According to the official publication of the NLRB’s “final rule” in the Federal Register, the NLRA poster requirement […]

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The California Labor Code requires employers to “provide” meal breaks when employees work over five hours. A dispute over the meaning of “provide” is currently being considered by the California Supreme Court. Must an employer ensure employees take their breaks (force them to stop working) or must it simply authorize and permit employees to take […]

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The California legislative season ended last month and Governor Jerry Brown recently finished signing and vetoing a batch of bills. For example, there’ll be new penalties for misclassifying workers as “independent contractors” rather than employees (SB 459). Besides a $5000 to $25,000 fine, violators will also have to post a notice on their website that […]

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California’s AB 1825 requires “supervisors” to receive two hours of training every two years on the prevention of unlawful harassment, discrimination and retaliation. To be in compliance, employers need to provide training to everyone who qualifies as a “supervisor.” And, the AB 1825 definition of “supervisor” is very broad. It includes anyone with authority to […]

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The winner from the CUPA-HR Annual Conference and Expo 2011, Jaffus Hardrick from Florida International University, receives his prize from LawRoom’s Kevin Kuhl. This years conference theme, “Inclusion Cultivates Excellence: Making a Difference,” highlights the importance of diversity and inclusion within higher education institutions, the HR profession, and the business of higher education. Congratulations to […]

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California supervisors must spend two hours training every two years on preventing sexual harassment under AB 1825. Many supervisors balk at reviewing the same materials or watching the same videos. To keep the subject fresh, LawRoom redesigns and produces new, interactive, and engaging online courses for each AB 1825 training year. Our goal is not […]

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In January 2011, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) announced a new rule requiring most private employers to put up a poster. In August, they finalized the rule (see NLRB Wants A Poster and NLRB Gets A Poster). The regulation says the poster must be put up by November 14, 2011. If you’re ready to […]

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