Training Motivates: Supervisor Anti-Harassment 18:40, May 16, 2016

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LawRoom’s training has consequences. One consequence is that managers learn of their potential personal individual liability for harassment. Here are two of the comments we received from managers taking our Supervisor Anti-Harassment course this week: “The first part was horrendously scary and made me want to curl up in a box and never enter a […]

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If employees get hurt working, they’re entitled to time off and to collect workers’ compensation benefits. But when they try to collect more, they may be suspected of fraud. For example, former Boston firefighter Albert Arroyo was acquitted from charges of fraud after he participated in bodybuilding competitions while on permanent disability leave. Prosecutors say […]

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Employees who stop working to help other people may be satisfying a moral duty, but does that justify them leaving their job duties? Some employers don’t think so. Last week, a Long Island bus driver was fired after letting three police officers on his bus during a violent storm. He says he didn’t think twice […]

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Included in the 2010 federal healthcare bill was a provision requiring time off for nursing mothers to express breast milk. See FLSA Lactation Breaks. The new lactation break law was enacted as an amendment to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) 29 USC §207. There’s a big loophole, however, since §207 is the federal overtime […]

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Employees and managers who harass their co-workers can be personally liable for their wrongdoing. They may face civil claims (for assault, battery, emotional distress, etc.) and criminal counts (for assault, battery, lewd conduct, etc.). Some states (including California) have anti-discrimination laws that also allow individuals to be sued for sexual harassment, although the federal law […]

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Employees must be paid for all of their work. But what happens when employees work at home, or at night and on weekends, and don’t tell anyone? The answer is that the law requires employers to pay for any work they “suffer or permit” to occur. So, whether employers must pay depends on whether they […]

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A bank analyst who claims to talk to God can sue for disability bias since her boss told her to undergo counseling. Why would that matter, you may ask? Although Title VII prohibits religious discrimination, it does not protect the jobs of employees who claim to hear God if they scare their co-workers with divine […]

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A recent case in Texas helps highlight the boundaries of what qualifies for a FMLA leave, and what doesn’t. Do daily calls and home repairs for a hospitalized daughter qualify? Here’s your answer.

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Verizon found out the hard way that “No Fault” attendance policies need to make accommodations for disabled and special needs employees. The price? A $20 Million settlement in a lawsuit brought by the EEOC. This case should make us all stop for a minute and think about our own workplace rules.  How does your company […]

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Dress codes exist in many forms and seemingly often create as many problems as they solve. Take, for example, the case of the young woman who was allegedly fired from her job with Abercrombie & Fitch for refusing to remove her religious headscarf while working in a company store. Where do company policies and image […]

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